Wisdom and Revelation

 “When I hear people talk about what is wrong with organized religion, or why their mainline churches are failing, I hear about bad music, inept clergy, mean congregations, and preoccupations with institutional maintenance. I almost never hear about the intellectualization of the faith, which strikes me as a far greater danger than anything else on the list. In an age of information overload, when a vast variety of media delivers news faster than most of us can digest – when many of us have at least two e-mail addresses, two telephone numbers, and one fax number – the last thing any of us needs is more information about God. We need the practice of incarnation, by which God saves the lives of those whose intellectual assent has turned as dry as dust, who have run frighteningly low on the bread of life, who are dying to know more of God in their bodies. Not more about God. More God.”

Barbara Brown Taylor, An Altar in the World

I don’t know the copyright year of this quote, but even since then we’ve added more devices and media diversion than she has listed.  More overload.  More distractions.  More dizzying haste.  Now, for the first time in history people are fasting from media.

While not all these things are bad, they contribute, if left unchecked in our lives, to even more information overload.  We’ve become information junkies…at a cost to our souls. I know I can read more and more about God, what others are saying about God, and find little time left over to interact with God himself. This causes us to live form our head and not our hearts.

“Behold, you desire truth in the innermost being” (Ps. 51:6 NASB). Having a doctrine pass before the mind is not what the Bible means by knowing the truth. It’s only when it reaches down deep into the heart that the truth begins to set us free.

A personal walk with God comes to us through wisdom and revelation. What we soon discover is that we need both.

This entry was posted in Intellectual Discipleship, The Heart and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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